power sled speed and quickness equipment

 

When it comes to sprinters and hurdlers, and power athletes in general, they live and “die” by their ability to accelerate as well as their top end speed.  According to Bruce Kelly, the power sled is a good tool for enhancing acceleration and by that I mean the first 5-10 meters of a race, after that it loses some of it’s effectiveness.

 

What kind of load should one use? Mr. Kelly posits that they should start with the standard recommendation of 10% of bodyweight and adjust from there depending on the ability, strength, and experience of your athletes. The key to look for, I believe, is how closely the sled allows the athlete to maintain close to normal acceleration mechanics. If it looks like they’re towing a small semi (i.e. hands on ground, crawling along) then it is probably too heavy. On the other hand if the load is too light the specific ground reaction force training you’re trying to develop may not happen.

Speed and Quickness Training with Speed and Quickness Equipment

 

There are really only 2 purposes for on-track training: neuromuscular adaptation and plyometric training (highly focused acceleration sports training).  According to Barry Ross, neuromuscular adaptation is teaching your body to adapt to high speed movements without loss of energy. You can only do that by running at your high speed as often as possible, but this is no secret.

Plyometric training, defined by Mr. Ross, causes a rapid change from eccentric contraction (lengthening a muscle) to concentric contraction (shortening a muscle), in which elastic energy is stored and released. The act of running fast is a plyometric exercise, so it trains for the storage and release of elastic energy. Elastic energy is a necessary part of increasing your speed. How much running should you do? The correct number of set or reps is based upon the portion of the race you need to work on. That differs for every sprinter.  Beginning in a few days, we will begin including plyometrics videos that improve both sprint speed and athletic (sports performance) speed.

 

 

speed and quickness training for long jumpIf the big muscles that we just strengthened to make us move faster in a straight line are not being controlled well enough by smaller muscle wear and tear of the joints can occur and soft tissue pain will most likely arise!  To avoid that, I suggest dynamic movement program endorsed by Lee Taft, which should continue as the minimum exercises preformed during the off-season, and as exercises which can precede agility exercises.

 

  1. Lateral Jumping Jacks- This is an exercise that has the athlete moving laterally with the arms and legs staying in the frontal plan the entire time. The athlete simply stands tall and shuffles sideways while the arms abducts and adduct fully as if performing a jumping jack moving to the side. The idea is to become rhythmical and long with the actions. There is a great emphasis on push off with the feet. This exercise will dynamically strengthen the lateral musculature structures of the body.
  2. Lateral knee drive run- In this exercise the athlete will run controlled sideways with a quick high knee drive of the back side leg. The arms will be out stretched to the sides at shoulder level. The goal is to strengthen the knee drive while eliciting a greater response from the adductor, internal rotator, and hip flexor musculature of the back side leg. The lead leg musculature will eccentrically reduce unwanted abduction during planting.
  3. Lateral band walks- Using a tubing/band that can be places around the ankles or above the knees, the athletes will simply walk laterally for a distance of 15-25 yards. This will put great contractions on the abductor muscles that surround the hip joint. This exercise can be done walking straight ahead with feet spread out or in many other patterns.
  4. Lateral step together- Attach the tubing to a post and place it around the inside of the nearest leg to the post. The athlete will simply step toward the post followed by bringing that leg back together with the other leg. This exercise should be done with a squatting motion when the leg is abducted and adducted. This will work many levels of the adductor musculature.
  5. Supine figure 8’s- The athlete lays on his back with the right leg straight up and knee locked. The athlete will imagine he is drawing a figure 8 on the ceiling with his heel. This is a demanding exercise that looks simple at first view.
  6. Supine leg raises- The athlete still on his back will raise the right leg straight up, with knee locked, and abduct the leg out to the side until touching the ground, return to the up position followed by a lower to the starting position. The leg then gets raise back up and then adducted across the body until it touches the ground, and immediately rises back up and slowly returns back to the starting position. This is a tremendous hip strengthener that will increase dynamic flexibility as well.
  7. Side plank- This is a great torso strengthener in the frontal plane. The athlete assumes a side lying position with the bottom forearm on the ground and the elbow the bottom arm directly under the shoulder. The legs are straight out with the top leg being over the bottom. The athlete simply raises the body up into a straight line from the ankles to the head. Hold this position for :30 to 1:30 or so.

Listed above is a small sample of exercises that should be done all year around, but during the off season the major limitations can be addresses before any other major strengthening occurs.

 

Posted with permission by @TheSpeedGuru

 

Speed Resistane Trainining with Speed and Quickness Equipment

When most  engage in strength training (weight room training) they do so with increasing strength and size.  However, size isn’t as important as it once was, even for lineman.  For the most part, it is all about speed. Therefore, we deemphasize size, and emphasize speed.

The strength training that we promote is designed to increase speed, more then increase size.  Strength will improve.  However, lighter weights used in quick bursts mimic the “in play” demands of an actual sport.  For this reason, we suggest allowing only 30 seconds between each set of repetitions.   For a 40 minute workout, which we recommend, iterations of exercises with only 30 second breaks will both build quickness AND endurance.  You will also get stronger.  After that 40 minute workout, we suggest timed sprints, preferably with speed parachutes.

The second part of your workout should really exhaust the locomotion of the legs.  This should occur within 5 minutes of completing your first 40 minute workout, so you will need to make arrangements where there is a location where you can quickly transition from weight room to football field or track.  When you finish this workout (3 times per week) you will feel exhausted.  However, you will be stronger, faster, and have more endurance in 3 months… we promise.

Hureld Speed Equipment TrainingThis is an off-season conditioning workout that I first found from Steve McGill. From a standing start, run 100 meters one way, rest 30 seconds, then run 100 meters the other way. In the early part of the off-season, you might not want to add any hurdles at all. Then, as conditioning increases, put two hurdles at the 50m mark (one hurdle facing one way, the other facing the other). Then move up to four hurdles (two facing one way, two facing the other); in this case, use the intermediate hurdle marks on the final straightaway for hurdle placement. A total of twenty-four 100 meter sprints would be a full conditioning workout. I generally will have my kids do four sets of six reps, with about three minutes rest between each set. This is a good workout to do on days when you’re pressed for time because, with only thirty seconds between reps, you’ll be getting in a lot of reps in a very short period. The emphasis here is not on speed at all. It’s more a matter of getting in the habit of maintaining running form when fatigued, and getting used to stepping over hurdles when fatigued.

Explosive Speed Training

Speed, strength and power is vital to the success of ALL track and field athletes whether competing in the sprints, jumps, throws or endurance events. One of the most effective methods of developing these traits in your athletes is through the use of medicine ball training, according to Latif Thomas.

Medicine ball throws are an interactive and fun method of training that athletes always enjoy. Use these exercises together in one workout or break them up into several different workouts. Often, we will make a competition out of the throws by dividing athletes into age/grade groups or event groups. That way athletes get the opportunity to compete against their peers. Latif Thomas categorizes this type of training as ‘tricking your athletes into working out’ because they always get into these workouts, making for an entertaining practice on many levels. At the same time, you are stressing the qualities that will improve their performance.

Agility Drillls from Speed Training using Speed Equipment

 

If the big muscles that we just strengthened to make us move faster in a straight line are not being controlled well enough by smaller muscle wear and tear of the joints can occur and soft tissue pain will most likely arise!  To avoid that, I suggest dynamic movement program endorsed by Lee Taft, which should continue as the minimum exercises preformed during the off-season, and as exercises which can precede agility exercises.

 

  1. Lateral Jumping Jacks- This is an exercise that has the athlete moving laterally with the arms and legs staying in the frontal plan the entire time. The athlete simply stands tall and shuffles sideways while the arms abducts and adduct fully as if performing a jumping jack moving to the side. The idea is to become rhythmical and long with the actions. There is a great emphasis on push off with the feet. This exercise will dynamically strengthen the lateral musculature structures of the body.
  2. Lateral knee drive run- In this exercise the athlete will run controlled sideways with a quick high knee drive of the back side leg. The arms will be out stretched to the sides at shoulder level. The goal is to strengthen the knee drive while eliciting a greater response from the adductor, internal rotator, and hip flexor musculature of the back side leg. The lead leg musculature will eccentrically reduce unwanted abduction during planting.
  3. Lateral band walks- Using a tubing/band that can be places around the ankles or above the knees, the athletes will simply walk laterally for a distance of 15-25 yards. This will put great contractions on the abductor muscles that surround the hip joint. This exercise can be done walking straight ahead with feet spread out or in many other patterns.
  4. Lateral step together- Attach the tubing to a post and place it around the inside of the nearest leg to the post. The athlete will simply step toward the post followed by bringing that leg back together with the other leg. This exercise should be done with a squatting motion when the leg is abducted and adducted. This will work many levels of the adductor musculature.
  5. Supine figure 8’s- The athlete lays on his back with the right leg straight up and knee locked. The athlete will imagine he is drawing a figure 8 on the ceiling with his heel. This is a demanding exercise that looks simple at first view.
  6. Supine leg raises- The athlete still on his back will raise the right leg straight up, with knee locked, and abduct the leg out to the side until touching the ground, return to the up position followed by a lower to the starting position. The leg then gets raise back up and then adducted across the body until it touches the ground, and immediately rises back up and slowly returns back to the starting position. This is a tremendous hip strengthener that will increase dynamic flexibility as well.

speed and quickness equipment for speed and quickness training

 

Foot quickness agility drills make you faster and improve coordination.  With those two attributes, athletes elevate their game, whether it is football, soccer, boxing, lacrosse, tennis, basketball, baseball, or whatever.  The benefits don’t stop with physical improvement however.

 

As foot quickness improves, and as performance follows, so too does mental outlook—namely confidence.  Confidence is absolutely essential.  Knowing that you can execute moves quicker is the key step towards actually incorporating a higher level of performance into your game of play.  Athletes elevate their game to new levels when they have increased their physically ability and combine that with the mental knowledge and confidence of application

HeadFootballCoach

speed and quickness equipment for speed and quickness training

 

My youngest son is a quarterback.  He is currently preparing for a football camp/combine that requires invitation.  We have two months to prepare, so we initially decided to train Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday to do throwing drills.  We went to the YMCA and taped five targets to a dividing screen that separates one half of the basketball court from another.  From four different positions, my son has to hit each target twice consecutively, then he has to do the same via rolling out, then he practices four three step drop lob throws  (for fade patterns).  All in all, these drills require 120 throws.

This morning, however, he complained that his throwing arm was tired and a bit sore, since we threw yesterday, the Saturday morning before.   I remember reading here on this blog that agility drills require two days rest in between.  However, I really hadn’t considered that the same might be true for quarterbacks.  The lesson learned is that such training days, from agility drills to quarterback drills, require two rest days in between.

Teaching the Long Jump to Long Jumpers

 

speed and quickness training for long jump

When introducing a young jumper the event of long jumping it is wise to start with the one thing you know they can do.  And, that is to run. Make no mistake about it; if the athlete isn’t fast they will never be a great long jumper. Speed is what carries the jumper the farthest distance (Regular sprints are good start, leading up to resistance training).

So to prepare young jumpers for long jumping, treat young jumpers like sprinters, according to Lee Taft. “Make sure they can execute a proper sprinting pattern and reproduce it over and over again. As the jumper learns the true essence of the long jump approach they will begin to develop their own style to meet their personality.”  For young jumpers, we suggest focusing on the speed portion the first several months, almost exclusively.  For seasoned jumpers, we remind them to continue their speed and agility exercises to maintain excellent speed and explosion through the air.